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Strictly speaking: foreign fruits

Exotic fruits keep arriving from overseas with foreign names which are hard to remember for those unfamiliar with the language of origin. The Japanese yuzu, a craggy-skinned lemon-like fruit the size of a billiard ball is a recent arrival, now ...

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Strictly speaking: lossy

Profit and loss are sharply contrasted in business, so investments must be loss‑proof, and only very select items can be loss‑leaders. These principles are in fact very old, hence the use of lossful in the 17th century, recorded in a ...

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Award-winning teacher’s equation for success

Dr Kevin Larkin can no longer claim to be an ordinary teacher. The Senior Lecturer (Mathematics Education) at Griffith University has just scooped the title of 2018 Australian University Teacher of the Year. As one of the 13 winners at the Australian ...

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You would believe what academics say

Is there a funnier university-related Twitter account than ‘Shit Academics Say‘? Sarcasm even seeps into its bio disclaimer: Retweets are not endorsements. They are performative engagement markers that intentionally confound direct alignment with ironic promotion, ambivalent reflection, or personal brand ...

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Strictly speaking: gaslighting

The American dictionary website, www.merriam-webster.com, regularly features words that are trending in dictionary searches. One recent example was gaslighting – not in the sense of the outdated mode of illuminating our city streets, but in the more recent definition of ...

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On the move: November

Davis moves on after 14 years Australia’s longest-serving VC, Professor Glyn Davis, has left his post at the University of Melbourne. Davis, UniMelb’s 19th VC, took the job in 2005 after a stint as Griffith VC and president. Davis will ...

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Strictly speaking: unicorns and zebras

We think of unicorns as imaginary, mythical creatures, so you may be surprised to learn they actually exist. In the world of business, it’s the name given to startup companies valued at more than US$1 billion. Venture capitalist Aileen Lee coined ...

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Strictly speaking: capitals

Capital letters create alternative forms for each character in the Roman alphabet. They help to mark the particular functions of certain words: those that start a sentence or identify proper nouns for persons (e.g. Quentin Bryce) or places (e.g. Australia), ...

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